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Gatsby Starter

Serve your Gatsby websites in the Edge.
Serve your Gatsby websites in the Edge.
Framework
Gatsby iconGatsby
Language
Javascript
Use cases

This is a Gatsby starter project.

Getting Started

First, run the development server:

npm run dev
# or
yarn dev
# or
pnpm dev
# or
bun dev

You can run the Gatsby starter project using Wasmer (check out the install guide):

wasmer run wasmer-examples/gatsby-wasmer-starter --net -- --port=3000

[!TIP] You can also run wasmer run . --net -- --port=3000 in the root of this repo, after running npm run build

Open http://localhost:3000 with your browser to see the result.

Deploy on Wasmer Edge

The easiest way to deploy your Gatsby app is to use the Wasmer Edge.

Live example: https://wasmer-edge-gatsby-sample.wasmer.app/

First, you'll need to run npm run build, and then, to deploy to Wasmer Edge:

wasmer deploy

[!NOTE] You will need to have Wasmer installed (check out the docs to install the Wasmer CLI!). You will also need to change the namespace in wasmer.toml to your own namespace and app name in app.yaml to your own app name.

🧐 What's inside?

A quick look at the top-level files and directories you'll see in a typical Gatsby project.

.
β”œβ”€β”€ node_modules
β”œβ”€β”€ src
β”œβ”€β”€ .gitignore
β”œβ”€β”€ gatsby-browser.js
β”œβ”€β”€ gatsby-config.js
β”œβ”€β”€ gatsby-node.js
β”œβ”€β”€ gatsby-ssr.js
β”œβ”€β”€ LICENSE
β”œβ”€β”€ package.json
└── README.md
  1. /node_modules: This directory contains all of the modules of code that your project depends on (npm packages) are automatically installed.

  2. /src: This directory will contain all of the code related to what you will see on the front-end of your site (what you see in the browser) such as your site header or a page template. src is a convention for β€œsource code”.

  3. .gitignore: This file tells git which files it should not track / not maintain a version history for.

  4. gatsby-browser.js: This file is where Gatsby expects to find any usage of the Gatsby browser APIs (if any). These allow customization/extension of default Gatsby settings affecting the browser.

  5. gatsby-config.js: This is the main configuration file for a Gatsby site. This is where you can specify information about your site (metadata) like the site title and description, which Gatsby plugins you’d like to include, etc. (Check out the config docs for more detail).

  6. gatsby-node.js: This file is where Gatsby expects to find any usage of the Gatsby Node APIs (if any). These allow customization/extension of default Gatsby settings affecting pieces of the site build process.

  7. gatsby-ssr.js: This file is where Gatsby expects to find any usage of the Gatsby server-side rendering APIs (if any). These allow customization of default Gatsby settings affecting server-side rendering.

  8. LICENSE: This Gatsby starter is licensed under the 0BSD license. This means that you can see this file as a placeholder and replace it with your own license.

  9. package.json: A manifest file for Node.js projects, which includes things like metadata (the project’s name, author, etc). This manifest is how npm knows which packages to install for your project.

  10. README.md: A text file containing useful reference information about your project.

πŸŽ“ Learning Gatsby

Looking for more guidance? Full documentation for Gatsby lives on the website. Here are some places to start:

  • For most developers, we recommend starting with our in-depth tutorial for creating a site with Gatsby. It starts with zero assumptions about your level of ability and walks through every step of the process.

  • To dive straight into code samples, head to our documentation. In particular, check out the Guides, API Reference, and Advanced Tutorials sections in the sidebar.

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